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Palestinian Commenters Say ISIS Was “Best-Case Scenario” For Mosul

By Tuesday, July 25, 2017

An estimated 500,000 civilians fled from Mosul since the takeover of ISIS in 2014. The city became a battlefield and its infrastructure was completely destroyed. Iraqis throughout the world mourned the loss of the land and the lives that were involved in the battle.

But on Monday, July 10, Iraqi Prime-Minister Haider Al-Abadi officially declared Mosul ISIS-free. Iraqis and Moslawis throughout the world celebrated with hope to return to their city and to revive and rebuild the region.

Shortly after Al-Abadi’s announcement was made, Palestinian newspaper Al-Quds published a video of Iraqi singer and songwriter Kathem Al-Saher congratulating the Iraqi Armed Forces and Iraqis throughout the world for the liberation of ‘our beloved Mosul’.

“Nineveh, my love, my beloved city, and the good children of Nineveh from all cultures and religions, the hearts of all Iraqis are with you,” Al-Saher said. “Thank you to all Iraqis who united and worked together for this great victory and defeating the evil, merciless, enemies of life. Congratulations to us all, to all Iraqis, for the return to our beloved Mosul.”

Kathem’s poetic message was nothing but positive and affectionate. However, the post was stormed with racist and hateful comments by the page’s followers (identified by their facebook profiles) calling Iraqis cowards, dogs, and extremely hateful remarks.

“Screw you and the Iraqi army,” one post read. “You’ve become traitors and your mentality is low and villainous including individuals we thought were good human beings.. you (Iraqis) all deserve to be slaves.”

Some even suggested that the presence of ISIS’ in Iraq was “the best-case scenario” as it “limits the Zionists from expanding” claiming that the Iraqi government is secretly working with Israel.

 

 

Iraqis (identified by their Facebook profiles) wasted no time responding. The top comment on the post—which had nearly 4,000 likes and engagements—stated:

 “… Long live Israel, and screw whoever sold his land and is now a criminal and a terrorist trying to remove the people deserve the land. Long live the Jewish people, God’s chosen people, and long live Zion—the cure for every terrorist. Long live Jerusalem the capital of the Jewish people, bless the IDF soldiers who defeat terrorism. I would like to raise the Israeli flag in the skies of Baghdad and expel anyone who represents barbarian terrorists in Baghdad. Screw every terrorist in Baghdad. Screw every terrorist and bless the IDF soldiers in defending their land from any terrorist.”

 

 

This comment was deleted by the Palestinian outlet Al-Quds in less than a day.

Although the comment was deleted, Iraqis made many other comments asking to unite with Israel. The engagements with those comments were all positive and backed by other Iraqis.

At the end of the day this is just an incident on Facebook, but it is worth noting that the people of Iraq want nothing but peace within their country and with their neighbors, and would not support those who wish destruction and instability upon Iraq.

Let’s pray that the desire of Iraqis fuels a new relationship with Israel to build a peaceful future between the two countries in their battles against terrorism.

 

Ivan Korkes is a member of the 2017 Philos Leadership Institute class, and served as an intern with the Philos Project this summer. An Assyrian Christian born in Baghdad, Iraq, Ivan and his family fled their homeland in 2003 and moved to Syria for safety. After living in Syria for nearly six years, he moved with his family to the United States in 2008 as refugees. He is pursuing a degree in international business at Illinois State University. Ivan is fluent in Assyrian (Neo-Aramaic) and has been certified by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages as a proficient Arabic speaker.

Ivan Korkes

Ivan Korkes is a member of the 2017 Philos Leadership Institute class, and served as an intern with the Philos Project this summer. An Assyrian Christian born in Baghdad, Iraq, Ivan and his family fled their homeland in 2003 and moved to Syria for safety. After living in Syria for nearly six years, he moved with his family to the United States in 2008 as refugees. He is pursuing a degree in international business at Illinois State University. Ivan is fluent in Assyrian (Neo-Aramaic) and has been certified by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages as a proficient Arabic speaker.

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